Tag Archives: Essex

Ex-Saint Mark Aims For The Wright Result On Sunday…

You may or may not have been following my coverage of Nivea For Men’s Great Football Experiment.

The experiment aims to see if you can take a regular Sunday League side (in this case Ivory Fc from the Brentwood League first division in Essex), give them the right coaching, nutrition, physio and facilities and turn them into a successful team. Coached by the likes of Terry Venables, Ray Wilkins and Ray Clemence the Ivory team have already had an impressive start to their league campaign, and the perennial strugglers currently lie top of the table.

This Sunday the Ivory lads get their biggest test though, when they face off against a team of England Legends!

Boasting over two hundred caps between them, the ex-pros will not want to be beaten by a ‘pub-side’ and will be going all out to ensure they don’t get egg on their faces.

Amongst the England legends will be ex-Saints legend Mark Wright, and GWC.com are proud to be his official backer for the match!

The no-nonsense but stylish defender made two hundred and twenty two appearances for Saints between April 1982 and May 1987 having signed from Oxford United and was part of the great Saints team that finished league runners up in the 1983/84 season. Lawrie McMenemy succesfully predicted at the time that he had just signed a future England player and got he his first cap within two years.

Fresh Face Saint Mark Wright - pic from exsaints.co.uk

Wright would have been a shoe in for the 1986 World Cup squad but unfortunately broke his leg in Saints FA Cup Semi final against Liverpool. Having left Saints for Derby County, he did however make the 1990 squad, scoring his only international goal, a crucial winner against Egypt in the group stages.

Wright went on to play for Liverpool and gain forty five caps for his country before moving into management with Southport, Oxford United, Peterborough and Chester City.

Wright in England Action - Image from theFA.com

Wright will lineup with his fellow ex-England pro’s at Dagenham & Redbridge’s Victoria Ground this Sunday for a 1400 kick off against the Ivory FC boys. His team mates consist of:- Ian Walker, Luther Blissett, Nigel Winterburn, Viv Anderson, Ray Parlour, Clive Allen, Rob Lee, Alvin Martin, Tony Woodcock and Rob Jones.

As Wrights official backers, Nivea For Men have given the readers of this site a chance to win bundle of their products! If Wright is selected as the England legends Man of the Match on Sunday, anyone who has retweeted this article, or commented on it below could be picked at random to win the prize!

Let’s hope we see some of Mark’s old school, classy defending and he catches the judges eye!

For previous articles on the Great Football Experiment check here.


Goal Celebrations. Another important lesson for Ivory FC….

Now that the Ivory FC players are well into the swing of their professional regime of training, nutrition and tactics, it was time for them to learn what is really important in football.

The Goal Celebration.

You may remember Icelandic team Stjarnan FC gaining worldwide fame last year when a youtube clip of their fishing celebration went viral, so who better than to give the Ivory boys a lesson than the Stjarnan players themselves.

Great Football Experiment expert Terry Venables was invited along, but celebrations aren’t his thing  “As much as I’d love to have given the Ivory Boys my advice, after the trouble Gazza got me into in ’96 with his infamous dentist chair goal celebration, I felt it best to stay well clear.”

Here is how the Ivory players got on:-

You might have thought that the Stjarnan FC player had rested on their laurels after their success last year, but now elaborate goal celebrations have become their calling card, here are some of their more recent designs:-

The Nivea for Men Great Football Experiment aims to prove that with the right coaching, nutrition, physio and facilities you can turn an average Sunday league team into a winning machine. Venables, Ray Wilkins, Ray Clemence and other FA coaches are overseeing Ivory FC as they assault the Brentwood Sunday League First division in Essex.

Catch up with all the latest goings on at Ivory FC here:- http://www.niveaformen.co.uk/football


Can You Coach Anybody?

That is the question being asked by the Nivea Great Football Experiment.

Nivea for Men have set out to find whether or not with England level coaching, physiotherapy and nutrition advice you can take an underperforming Sunday League team and turn their fortunes around.

Over six hundred amateur teams entered for the chance to have their whole regime changed by some seasoned professionals.

The winners were Ivory FC from Billericay in Essex, formed as recently as 2007, they finished 6th of the ten teams in the Brentwood Sunday League First Division last season, winning seven of their eighteen games.

So can the professionals turn them into title challengers?

A team from the FA led by former England player and manager Terry Venables have been working closely with the Ivory FC players over the summer as they prepare them for the coming season. Eighty Four capped Ray Wilkins and Sixty One capped Ray Clemence assisted by experienced FA coaches Rob Pithers and Nick Emery are getting the lads into shape, while they also have access to proper physiotherapy facilities and nutritional advice.

They may have lost 4-0 to a side made up of celebrities recently but the team have already shown vast improvements, and they will be hoping to put on a good show when they take on a team of ex-England stars at the end of the month.

I will be tracking the progress of the side here, so we can see how much of a difference professional expertise can really make…

Good Luck Ivory FC from georgeweahscousin.com!


The Worst Manager England (Almost) Never Had…

The other night, I decided to run a little competition to get myself to 500 followers on twitter, the reward for being my 500th follower (other than a daily intake of my wittiest and fascinating 140 character world insights) was that I would write a piece on here that would revolve around the supported club of the new follower.

Unfortunately, rather like Chris Iwelumo on an international debut, I took my eye off the ball. This meant I wasn’t sure if Brighton fan @Mareschappie or Southend fan @CallumReavelll was number 500, so I sensibly did, the only thing I could do, I bravely declared that I would write a piece that involved both clubs. Now, I wanted this piece to have a positive spin for both clubs, otherwise, what kind of prize is that?

This proved to not be easy. The two clubs, while both rich with individual history don’t seem to have any mutual heroes, neither do they share any years where both achieved something of note. Then I hit upon somebody who achieved something with both clubs, and what’s more, a man who is well known throughout English football and in my opinion, the worst manager England never had….

You often hear Brian Clough described as “The greatest manager England never had”, his achievements in club football are as well known as they are remarkable, and the decision not to employ him as the boss of the national team after interviewing him in 1977 is one that often makes people wonder what might have been. Clough’s assistant Peter Taylor was also revered for the job he did with Derby County and could have followed “Ol big head” to Lancaster Gate had the FA seen differently. Another Peter Taylor came even closer to the three lions dugout, in fact he was in it once, but what now seems implausible, he was also interviewed for the England job full time in 2006, and not just as assistant.

Peter John Taylor started his career at Southend United, near to his home town of Rochford, Essex. A winger by trade, Taylor was a pivotal part of the Shrimpers side that won promotion from the fourth division in 1971/2, and was soon catching the eye of bigger clubs. Taylor went on to play for Crystal Palace and Spurs at the peak of his career and gained four England caps, the first of which he gained while still playing in the third division at Selhurst Park, but it is as a manager that Taylor is mainly remembered.

Peter Taylor as an England Player

Taylor did his managerial apprenticeship in non-league football with Dartford, where he spent four years with much success. Southern cup winners twice (denied a third in the 1990 final) and two Southern league championships saw Taylor sought after by his former club Southend. Taylor took the reigns at Roots Hall in 1993 and would last just sixty six games. He suffered that unfortunate turn of fortunes, going from fans favourite for his exploits on the pitch to hate figure for his fortunes off it. For further examples see Souness, Graeme and Gunn, Bryan. Taylor’s Southend tenure was described in the clubs own history records as “disastrous” and he was soon on his way back to the non-league with Dover Athletic.

In what must have been a bizarre turn of events for the Southend fans, Taylor was only with the Kent club for two months, before being appointed as manager of the England U21’s as part of Glenn Hoddle’s new staff. It was the subsequent period with Englands “young lions” that for me, Taylor’s reputation and all future job offers were based on. He carved a persona as good man manager who the players liked and had a decent record, losing just twice in nineteen competitive games during his time at the helm. The likes of Frank Lampard, Rio Ferdinand, Michael Owen and Emile Heskey were brought into the setup by Taylor, and became four of the eleven to make the step up to the full squad under his guidance. Actually his replacement by Howard Wilkinson in June 1999 was controversial at best, and for seemingly no reason other than moving Hoddle’s men out.

In what was now becoming a commonplace feature of Taylor’s managerial career he yo-yo’d all the way down to the second division with Gillingham, proving his England U21 succeses were no fluke, taking the Gills to playoff glory at the first attempt. Leicester City, hot from several years of success under Martin O’Neill, including a League Cup win and european football decided to appoint Taylor in 2000. For many people this is where he got found out. He started well, but soon the performances tailed off. Dressing room unrest amongst senior players Steve Walsh and Tony Cottee coupled with a poor start to the 2001/02 season and gaining a reputation with the Filbert Street faithful for poor transfer dealings (Taylor spent £23 million in his time at Leicester, including £5 million for Ade Akinbiyi, £3 million for James Scowcroft and £1.5 million for Trevor Benjamin) saw Taylor sacked and destined never to manage in the top flight again (to date).

During his spell at Leicester, Taylor did however have perhaps his finest hour. After the resignation of Kevin Keegan as England manager in October 2000, the FA needed someone to take the reigns for a friendly against Italy in Turin. Taylor didn’t mess around and decided to use his opportunity to put his own stamp on proceedings, turning to many of his U21 stalwarts, Rio Ferdinand, Gareth Barry, Jamie Carragher, Seth Johnson, Emile Heskey and Keiron Dyer. He also handed David Beckham the England captaincy for the first time. England lost the tie 1-0, but it would be the start of a long international career for many of those players and notably a renaissance for the newly crowned skipper.

For keeps....

Taylor, wounded from his experiences at Leicester, but also strangely bouyed by his chance with the national team, ended up on the South Coast with Brighton & Hove Albion. Here he proved again, that getting a club promoted from one of the lower divisions was not difficult for him, as he guided the Seagulls to top spot in the second division. This may have been the start of something special for Taylor, but he left at the end of the season, claiming “lack of financial resources” as his reason. He was soon back in football though, back in the basement division with Hull City. An attractive prospect for Taylor, soon to be moving into their new stadium and serious financial backing meant he could soon work his promotion magic, getting the Tigers from Division three to Division one in three seasons.

During his time at the KC stadium, the FA came calling again, and Taylor took on the U21’s as a part time role. It didn’t go quite as well in his second spell, though competitively results were good. James Milner was the young star, as England again came close in the European championships. Taylor’s achievements at Hull had been noted by his former club Crystal Palace and they took him on to lead them to promotion from the Championship and around the same time, Sven Goran Eriksson left his role as England manager. Taylor confirmed in an interview with the Independent that he had been interviewed for the vacant position and life must have seemed pretty rosy. Unfortunately for him, he did not get the job, and the shake up meant he was relieved of his duties with the young lions too. If that wasn’t a bad enough chain of events, form at Palace dipped dramatically and with the possibility of relegation a very real one, Taylor was sacked.

Unsuccessful spells at conference side Stevenage Borough and League Two Bradford City sandwiched another lower league promotion with Wycombe Wanderers.

So is Taylor the worst manager England never had? Despite being the one of the most qualified coaches in the country, his managerial record is up and down. Somewhat of an expert at getting sides promoted from the lower divisions, quite what the FA saw in him as a top level manager is beyond me. A man manager? His 96-99 U21 side would say yes, his 2000 Leicester side would beg to differ. A tactician? Supporters of his lower league promotion sides would say so, those of his higher level clubs would not.

Luckily for us, the FA chose not to employ the Englishman with no great success record behind him, and opted for Steve McClaren, and we all know how that turned out….

Swings & Roundabouts?