Tag Archives: Exeter City

Steel City Islander: Lewis Buxton

In a rare break from the Saints related subject matter, I was delighted to catch up with newly promoted Sheffield Wednesday star Lewis Buxton. I am lucky enough to have known Lewis and his family for many years and have watched his career with interest.

Having learnt his trade on the Isle of Wight, a place where not many young kids make the grade Lewis is now enjoying a fruitful career with one of the countries biggest clubs in Sheffield Wednesday. Sealing promotion to the Championship under new boss Dave Jones, Lewis is looking forward to another spell at the higher level, but it hasn’t always been plain sailing for the Islander….

As one of the few pros to come out of the game on the Island, do you feel that it is a disadvantage for kids here?

LB  “It’s a disadvantage, everyones knows that the Island has a low population so competition isn’t as intense as the big cities. To get the best out of anyone in sport you need to be competing against the best opposition, every week from an early age, the last thing you want is a team winning 14-0 for most of the season. I don’t know what the kids leagues are like now but if they don’t already then it would give the kids a better chance with a structure that has all the current sides feeding one team playing in the Southampton league and one in the Portsmouth league which take all the best players from the existing teams. Kids develop at different rates so some would be dropped out of the teams playing in the mainland leagues and others promoted to them. This would progress the talented kids quicker and give them the best chance to get scouted for professional clubs at a young age. They would then receive the top quality coaching which they need to move onto the next level .

There was however a very good bunch of players in my age group in the Island league at the top 3 or 4 teams. We also played regularly in tournaments against mainland sides at school level, and for East Cowes from an early age we played in the national indoor final at Aston Villa. We won a Hampshire tournament at the Dell, and played at Fratton Park in a similar tournament. We were one game away from Wembley in another. We were entered into these school tournament’s by a very good P.E teacher Mr. McArther so he gave us the opportunity to progress against top opposition as young players.

The stretch of water does make even the the most dedicated kids doubt if it’s all worth it. Travelling over the water from the age of 14 three times a week leaving home at half 4 and getting in 6 hours later for an hour/hour and a half of training straight after school is not much fun. I personally did not enjoy the travelling and the waiting around for hours and contemplated giving up on numerous occasions. You go from playing in your local team with all your best mates and really enjoying it, to joining a new team that all know each other because they play in the top 2 or 3 local sides in Pompey. That is difficult as a young kid and my football struggled at this stage but again I was lucky we had a strong group from the Island that would go over to play for Portsmouth schoolboys together. On top of that, Portsmouth didn’t pay for your travel and the majority of the time you were not getting picked up as the coaches had to train the younger age groups before our age group. It was a joint taxi or the bus, and If the lads you travelled with were ill it would mean getting the bus on your own.”

How did you get involved with Pompey?

LB “I got scouted by Roger North playing for the school. He invited me and my best mate Adam Howarth to train at his soccer school in Sandown where we progressed to his side at Portsmouth’s centre of Excellence. Without the work of Roger, Andrew and Shaun North I wouldn’t have become a professional footballer.”

Lewis at Pompey.

How big was the skill gap between playing in the Island youth teams and then being amongst the young lads at a pro club?

LB “There was a slight gap but we had a good bunch of players on the Island at that age. The best players on the Island at that time competed with Portsmouth’s best but there were just a lot of good players at Pompey.”

Having been a regular at Fratton Park, you found yourself loaned out to Exeter and Bournemouth once Harry Redknapp came in? Do you think this enhanced your career or held you back?

LB “It held me back, I had played 30 games for Pompey in the Championship, and before one game Ted Buxton (not my uncle, as I’ve been told he must have been when telling this story) told me he was trying to get me into the England youth set up and was feeling I could do anything, then I was being farmed out to Exeter a team near the bottom of the football league and low on confidence.

Bournemouth was a good grounding for me though and I had a lot to thank then manager Sean O’Driscoll for. It gave me a good platform for my career in a strong passing side. It was a great club with great staff. Portsmouth had moved on too quickly for me and Harry had turned a struggling Championship side into a Premiership side in no time. Playing in a reserve team and not training with the first team for long periods I lost my way and my focus, I lacked guidance and developed a bad attitude because I felt hard done by.”

After a decent spell with Stoke City, you now find yourself settled with Sheffield Wednesday. It must be brilliant to play for such a big club?

LB “Sheffield Wednesday is a massive club and after a bit of a struggle initially, I worked extremely hard and I’ve played well this season. We came with a strong late run to beat our local rivals to the 2nd spot. We beat them in the derby at Hillsborough in front of around 35,000, the atmosphere was electric, for players playing in the third tier of English football it’s unbelievable and all the players should be proud to play in such a game that means the world to both sets of supporters. In the last game of this season we beat Wycombe in front of nearly 40,000 fans, it was a great feeling but the club belongs in the next league up and in the next few years I hope we’ll get there.”

Buxton & Wednesday. Championship Bound.

Who influenced your career in Island Football?

LB “I would say initially my mum and dad and the friends in East Cowes who I hung around with. Mike Parkman who gave up a lot of his time to manage our East Cowes side which was no easy task. Then obviously Roger, Sean and Andrew North for bringing me through at Portsmouth. As a kid I knew Lee Bradbury had become a pro footballer and so had Gary Rowett. Our PE teacher Mr. Reynolds would always go on about them and how Gary had won the Hampshire Cup (we made it to the final and lostl). They both went to my school so although I didn’t know them I knew it was possible to make it.”

You played for a successful East Cowes youth side. Did you expect others from that team to make it?

LB “We had a very talented group of players who were all good friends at East Cowes, we then brought in better players from Sandown such as Sam Dye and Micky Sherry who had the talent, but again were at a disadvantage being from the Island. The main one though would be one of my best mates, Adam Howarth, we were both from East Cowes and in the Isle of Wight schools sides, Hampshire and Portsmouth kids sides together, always battling to be better than each other so he could have made it given a chance at YTS level. Shaun Cooper another of my best mates who plays for Bournemouth was in the same Pompey kids team as us and was another we played against at school.”

You’ve played under a few different managers, who have you enjoyed playing for the most?

LB “I enjoyed playing for Graham Rix, as a 17 year old, he and my youth team coach Mark O’Connor gave me great confidence, I was gutted when he got sacked.

What advice would you give a young Island footballer with hopes of going pro?

LB “I would say:-

1. Move to Southampton or Portsmouth, the Island is a nice and safe place to live but if you want to be a professional footballer you are up against it. If you can’t move I would say the kids that are the best at a young age need to play for the year above to begin with. This is something Shaun Cooper and I did.

2. Work as hard as possible, if someone says your not good enough then work harder. One of the lads at Wednesday (Jose Semedo) was in the same year of the Sporting Lisbon Academy as Ronaldo and is good friends with him still. He said that the hardest working player he ever played with was Ronaldo, it is no coincidence he is the best. Well second best behind the greatest of all time (Messi). I was told the same thing about Ronaldo by the former fitness coach of Manchester United too.

3. Start sprint training early you can make it with less quality if your faster than everyone else.

4. Watch the best players in the world as much as possible.

5. Learn to be comfortable using every part of your body to control and manipulate the ball.”

Thanks to Lewis for his time.

Chris

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Crossing The Divide: Jon Gittens

“I didn’t realise quite the level of intensity and hatred there was there. It was the one derby I hadn’t done – because they hadn’t played for so long – and I didn’t realise it was going to be right up there with all the others. It’s palpable. You understand how much it means to both sets of fans to win the match.” – Referee Graham Poll after the 2nd December 2003 derby at St. Mary’s.

In the build up to the next South Coast Derby on December 18th, I decided to have a look at the players who crossed the divide and turned out in Pompey blue and Southampton Red & White.

The second in this series looks at a man who unites the fans in their opinions of his abilities as a player and who fittingly made his last appearance as a South Coast player in a derby.

Jon Gittens

A South Coast derby will be hostile occasion for the away side at the best of times, but on the 7th January 1996, it was a particularly nerve wracking experience for one of the visiting Pompey players to the Dell.

For Jon Gittens, it was a case of returning to his old stomping ground as well as a matter of local pride.

Midlands born Gittens was a trainee Tailor while playing for local non-league side Paget Rangers when he was snapped up by Saints in 1985. The twenty one year old central defender made his first team debut in April the following year and initially looked like he was going to become a regular in the first division sides lineup. Gittens found it difficult to get games ahead of the relied upon Mark Wright and Kevin Bond though and having already gained a reputation for being rough and ready Gittens was offloaded to Swindon Town by Chris Nicholl for a fee of £40k.

Nicholl would pay ten times that to bring Gittens back to the Dell just four seasons later. Gittens second spell proved to be as fruitless as the first, playing second fiddle to the likes of Neil Ruddock and Richard Hall in the Premier League, and he was soon loaned to first division Middlesbrough.

While Gittens will never be remembered as one of the clubs best players, Saints fans will always look upon Gittens as a trier and a tough player, but one that “Never looked like cutting it at Saints” according to @ThePhilReed. “Gittens was flipping hard!” was the verdict from Saints fan @alexgbourne “He was rock solid and gave his all.”

Gittens the Saint.

After helping Middlesbrough gain promotion to the Premier League, Gittens made his move to the North East permanent but found himself back on the South Coast and in the first division again with Portsmouth just a year later.

His first two seasons at Fratton saw Gittens establish himself as a regular under Jim Smith and then Terry Fenwick. Still renowned for his love of getting stuck in, Pompey fan @simmouae remembers him as a “booking a game man” as his no-nonsense approach made him a regular in front of the officials. Gittens had seemingly found his level in the First division, although Pompey were struggling, @Lord_Palmerston recalls “Gittens was strong but had the turning circle of an oil tanker. On his way downhill before he joined PFC but reasonable at our level”.

Gittens would find first team games more difficult to come by in the 1995/96 season and his trip back to the Dell in January 1996 in the FA Cup third round would prove to be his ninety ninth and last appearance for Portsmouth.

Gittens the Blue.

Gittens headed west to play for another set of rivals in Torquay United and Exeter City respectively before heading to non-league football.

After management spells with Fareham Town and Blackfield & Langley the UEFA A licensed coach is now training other coaches for the Football Association.

Chris

Get Well Soon Dan Seaborne.

It was with much sadness that I read the news yesterday about Dan Seaborne being assaulted outside a Southampton nightclub. With his condition now being considered “stable” by the medical staff at the Wessex Neurological Unit, signs are good that Dan is going to be ok.

Get Well Soon Dan.

Dan has been a fully committed professional since joining the club from Exeter City in 2010 and georgeweahscousin.com would like to wish him a speedy recovery.

I want to be in that number….

Chris

Is Dan Seaborne Single?

That seems to be the question on many a googler’s lips, and one of many weird and wonderful search terms that lead people to this site.

Unfortunately for them, they will of course leave disappointed, I have no idea whether Seaborne is single or not, and this isn’t a lonely hearts site. What I do know, is that he maybe a centre half about to find himself in an incredibly unlucky position.

Signed from Exeter City in January 2010, he has largely played second fiddle to Radhi Jaidi as the man to partner Jose Fonte, and was often criticised for being less than cultured a player when he did deputise last season.

The start of this season though, has seen Seaborne given a run in the side alongside Fonte, starting all but the opening game so far. In fairness, his performances have come with mixed reviews, but what does seem clear is that they are much improved. Strong in the air, and pulling off some last ditch saving tackles, Seaborne has proved a few people wrong in the early stages of the campaign and has been part of a fantastic and record breaking start for the club, so it now seems a little unfair that everybody seems certain that the club needs to invest in a new defender.

They always use an old photo....

Ammer Jemal, Kasper Gorkss, and Liam Fontaine have been the names touted to come in at St. Mary’s, but I am not 100% sure we need them. In Seaborne and Aaron Martin we have two young centre halves chomping at the bit, and in a season opening that has seen just one unlucky defeat so far, haven’t really put a foot wrong.

I know that we should be constantly looking at improving the squad and perhaps Seaborne in particular may be a victim of the way we want to play possession football, with every man needing to be comfortable on the ball, but this is still England, and still the Championship and someone of Seaborne’s build, strength and ability will no doubt come in handy against particular sides. Personally I have always been a fan of having two centre halves of differing styles, one continental type, the other old fashioned English bruiser!

Whatever happens in the next twenty four hours, and whether a new defender is brought in or not, hopefully Dan Seaborne has a GSOH and WLTM the challenge head on…

Chris

A Saint Amongst Them: Millwall…

This is the first in what will be a regular feature on georgeweahscousin.com where I will take a look at any former Saints amongst the next opposition.

Danny N’Guessan

First up, is someone who is making a quick return to St. Mary’s this weekend having played for the club as recently as May.

The Frenchman didn’t make as big an impact as he might have liked after joining from Leicester City, making just seven appearances for the club, and not finding the net once. The winger come striker was still a valuable member of Nigel Adkins squad rotation system though and played his part in Saints promotion campaign, most notably in a man of the match performance at Exeter City.

Millwall makes it six English clubs for N’Guessan now, having also previously appeared for Scunthorpe, Lincoln and Boston United.

Whether or not he features on Saturday is as yet unknown as he has picked up a knock, but Millwall have started the season almost as brightly as Saints and N’Guessan himself has already bettered his Southampton record, netting the winner on his debut for the Lions at Home Park against Plymouth. Must like the South West!

From Saint to Lion - Danny N'Guessan.

Opposition’s view:-

Millwall fan Steve Hudson gives his lowdown on N’Guessan:-

“When Millwall fans were wondering over the summer who Kenny Jackett would bring in to replace Steve Morison and Neil Harris up front, several relatively high profile names came across the rumour mill. Craig Mackail-Smith, Ishmail Miller, Nile Ranger, Jordan Rhodes, and Rob Hulse were among the names out there. One name that did not come up at all until the day he signed was Dany N’Guessan. N’Guessan is a player that would start up front for a vast majority of Championship level teams, but at Leicester he is surplus to requirements. Coming to Millwall just two days before their Carling Cup tie at Plymouth, he was inserted into the starting lineup for that game and went and scored just 14 mintues in, with the eventual deciding goal in a 1-0 win.  He then played a role in Millwall’s 2-0 win over Nottingham Forest four days later. Although he picked up a hamstring injury in that game and is out for what is hopefully a short time, it’s clear that N’Guessan has the size and pace to be a force at this level if given the opportunity, something he wasn’t going to get at Leicester. Coming to a team relatively short of attacking options in Millwall, he will get that chance now.”

Chris