Tag Archives: Pierre-Emile Højbjerg

The Saints Primaries: Who Will Be Player of the Year?

Greetings Readers, if you are a long term visitor of this barely maintained blog you will know that one of the highlights is the end of season awards. The main talking point amongst fans is usually who will be crowned the player of the year. You will need little reminder that the previous few seasons have had few highlights under a trio of enjoyment vacuums at the helm and often the POTY is a stand out individual amongst a myriad of mediocrity. Since Ralph Hasenhüttl arrived though, things have started to look up and several players have shone under the Austrian’s dynamic and intensive regime.

Four in particular for me have stood out, so for a change of tactic for this year’s awards I decided to gauge public opinion. Below were the results:-

It seemed clear cut at that stage, but with all the contenders getting votes, I wondered if it would possibly change over the run in of the season. With that thought, and the fact that everyone is really engaged with politics right now (Brexit is fascinating right?) I thought I would up the ante and ask for someone who voted for each candidate to act as their campaign manager. Maybe their impassioned backing of their favourite could swing a few votes? Or at least give each candidate some recognition. So here we go…

The campaign for Jan Bednarek by @ELIELIELIELIEL_ : –

‘Jan Bednarek has been Southampton’s most important player this season.

This may seem a reach as he hasn’t netted a goal this season, but his work at the back has been crucial in securing points. With interceptions and goal line clearances just part of his game, I can whole heartedly say that his presence in the back line fills me with great confidence; not only because of his ability to defend but his calm and collectiveness whilst doing so.

Having not missed a league game since the departure of Hughes and consistently putting in amazing performances in crucial games it is clear he has been the most important player for Saints this season. Crucial games seem to be what he thrives upon, putting in some of his best performances against Chelsea (A), Leicester (A), Spurs (H), Everton (H) and most recently Wolves. I personally believe that had he gone out on loan we would have been in a worse position than we are now and feel the team gets confidence from the fact we have a reliable centre half.

50 interceptions and 151 clearances from this season alone just goes to show how crucial the Polish Maldini has been.’

The campaign for Pierre-Emile Højbjerg by @TheFalseLibero : –

‘Oh Pierre Hojbjerg, the one and only, he’s from DENMARK.

Højbjerg is from Denmark, and unlike his countrymen predecessors at Southampton – Michael Stensgaard (who?!) and Peter Madsen – he’s actually quite good; rather like the first Danish player to play for Saints was. Ronnie Ekelund was Johan Cruijff’s gift to Saints in 1994, and 22 years later, one of Cruijff’s finest understudies – Pep Guardiola – gifted us Højbjerg. Romantic isn’t it?

Remarkably, he is still only 23-years old. With all his tattoos, his face going proper red when he’s up for it, and the armband looking all snug round his magnificent bicep, he looks at least 25. If he continues charging round the pitch – or box to box, if you like your jargon – picking up more cards than any one else at Saints, he’ll look at least 28 next year.

He’s quite literally the centre of our play. With an average of 58 passes per game, 17 more than second-place Lemina, who was last seen not driving his car (because it was possibly his cousin, or his brother – he’s not sure) and 21 more than fellow Dane Jannik Vestergaard, everything goes through him. Everything apart from the opposition; he goes through them to the tune of 7 yellow cards and 2 reds, and in return is the most fouled played in Red and White.

When he’s not doing all the above, he’s busy contributing to the scoring of goals. With 4 goals and 2 assists, only Ings (9) and Redmond (8) have done more of those things.

The other nominees? MEH. The best? PEH.’

The campaign for Nathan Redmond by @SaintMat24 : –

‘Arguably Nathan Redmond has been one of the most derided players by Saints fans (including myself) in recent memory. This season however, he has played a crucial role in the Saints attack, the dissenting voices are fading away and he is a player transformed.

Now I find myself telling you why he is my player of the season.

No longer do we have the all too regular cut-inside-to-right-foot-cross-come-shots, but a player willing to take his man on in any direction. He is more aggressive in his play with the ball, which utilises his pace and makes the most of his natural technique.

However the biggest change for me is the team responsibility he has taken on. Ahead of the 3-1 victory over Wolves, Redmond told Josh Sims “If you end up breaking, …fizz the ball across the box… if me and Ingsy aren’t there that’s our problem”. Redmond is not afraid to make things happen now, to orchestrate moves and place himself at the centre of all things when Saints attack.

In my mind, no player is more important to Saints than Nathan Redmond has been this season. That’s why he should be your player of the season too.’

The campaign for James Ward-Prowse by @ArthurFane : –

‘After featuring only fleetingly in the first half of the season, it’s been a real pleasure to see James Ward-Prowse become a mainstay of Hasenhuttl’s side and begin to fulfil his enormous potential.

His ability over the set piece has always been the jewel in his crown – something reinforced by his stunning strikes against Man Utd and Spurs – it’s his all-round game though that has really hit next level this season.

I’ve for some time felt the ‘nice guy’ attitude was holding Ward-Prowse back – technically gifted, but rarely seen making combative challenges or busting a gut to recover the ball. 2019 has not only seen him cover more ground than any other Premier League player but has revealed his nasty side (Zaha sending off anyone?) He is no longer easily pushed off the ball and is absolutely vital to the way we now play.

His tally of 6 league goals in 2019 is bettered by only two Englishmen, Vardy & Sterling, rewarding him with a first England call-up since March 2017. Hughes’ regular failure to pick the midfielder will no doubt damage his chances, but Prowsey would richly deserve to win Player of the Season.’

So there we have it. Now it’s up to you.

Monotony & Apathy

‘Live together in perfect harmony’

Well, after another long term hiatus I’m back again. It’s been a while. The whole WordPress backend has changed, I’ve turned 40, and I’m not sure if it’s a combination of the two, or one of those things in particular, but I feel like I don’t know what the hell I’m doing. Do not fear though dear reader, I’ve never let such a trivial matter as incompetence stop me before and I’m not about to start now!

I return to you rejuvenated. For I do not mind admitting that the last two and half years supporting Saints had become a struggle, and Saturday afternoons had become more about a pint and a chinwag with the Dubai Saints, and less about the ‘football’. Those of you that follow our Facebook Page or Twitter will know that we have a tradition of a group photo and the hashtag #win when we win (not rocket surgery), and when I first moved here drunkenly posing for these celebratory shots was the norm, but until recently they had become as rare as a Dejan Lovren winner’s medal.

Now, don’t get me wrong, this isn’t a ‘woe is me, we don’t win every week’ post. I started going to the Dell in 1992, I can handle watching a pile of crap week in week out. The issue was not about how good the players were, or even whether we won, lost or drew, though of course winning is always the preferred option. Somewhere along the way, we lost our identity. It became boring, and my feeling towards Saints became apathetic. So what changed?

As is usual, when the fortunes of a football club change, it is likely a combination of factors rather than any one particular person or event. Let’s start with the coaches. When Ronald Koeman left us for Everton he was the fourth manager in a row that had been a successful appointment for Saints. He was also the fourth to have a presence, a personality and an aura around them that inspired a confidence in the fans, and logically the players too.

Claude Puel was none of those things. Not a bad bloke, just an incredibly dull one, and he coupled a lack of charisma off the pitch with monotonous, uninspiring football on it. Baffling team selections (Inter Milan Away anyone?) and zero risk taking that might turn a draw into a win condemned him to being the most successful disliked manager in Southampton history. Saints fans were largely mocked by the nations media and ex pros for wanting the Frenchman sacked, despite finishing 8th place in the Premier League and reaching the League Cup Final, and now Leicester fans find themselves in the same position, with the same complaints and the same mockery from the same sources. Coincidence?

https://twitter.com/FcPuel/status/1085224470900555777

The end of the Puel season meant a fresh start. Surely, the appointment of such a man far removed from the recent ideals of the club was a blip. Nope. We literally went and got the Argentine equivalent. That might be a little harsh, Mauricio Pelligrino at least talked a good game when he arrived, but it’s staggering to think the same nation that produced Maradona, Messi, Bielsa and a whole host of other footballing characters also brought us ‘Senor Frijol’. The football wasn’t a lot better, the results were even worse, and relegation beckoned to the soundtrack of scoffing and hand wringing from the ‘Ridiculous to sack Puel, what do Southampton expect’ brigade.

Saints were sleepwalking to the Championship under Pellegrino, of that I have no doubt. A lack of goals, a weak backbone and an uncanny knack of throwing away a lead meant he had to go. At the time, I called for Saints to be pragmatic for once and agreed with them that Leslie Mark Hughes was the only viable option. This was based on nothing more than the requirement for top flight experience when you are staring into the abyss that is the football league. And I was right. Sort of.

Let us not change history. The fact of the matter is that ‘Sparkey’ did what looked impossible and kept us up. Whether or not you believe that is down to his management/coaching ability or that there were simply three teams even worse than us is for you to decide. I am happy to admit that I believed he had earnt his chance for the job full time. More fool me. My apathy perhaps even reached peak under the reign of the miserable Welsh custodian of proper hand shake etiquette.

Under the tutelage of these three charisma vacuums, the club I loved was transformed from the industry leading, innovative, academy pushing, supremely likeable, entertaining, big boy toppling, exciting unit that were a joy to watch, no matter the result into a turgid collection of hapless misfits that were a chore to endure. I, like many Saints fans found myself watching the games only out of some ridiculous sense of unenforced duty.

But were the managers the only problem?

Les Reed. Let this be the official stance of georgeweahscousin.com. I was never one to turn on Reed, and I am grateful to the man for the role he played in the best era of supporting Saints in my life. But, as the old saying goes, ‘Sometimes, a change is as good as a rest’. With two and a half poor managerial appointments in a row, it can only be fair to say, the magic had perhaps dried up. It certainly felt like things had gone stale behind the scenes, and the decision to remove Reed from his role when it came to it, was a long time coming. Not only did the coaching choices go downhill, but so did the recruitment of players. The time of unearthing gems like Mane, Van Dijk etc was gone, and what followed was a string of expensive failures. Sofiane Boufal, Wesley Hoedt and Garrido Carrillo all cost big money and are all now out on loan, likely on wages that make them difficult to move them on permanently. Jannik Vestegaard and Elyounoussi are the latest to struggle to make an impact on the first team.

Which brings me to the playing squad itself. Throughout this tough period, there was often the suggestion that the squad itself, simply wasn’t good enough for the Premier League, that it lacked the quality to succeed as it once had done. For me this was never the case, and while recruitment wasn’t necessarily improving the starting XI, we still had a top ten Premier League squad, they were just being poorly utilised and poorly motivated. Good players don’t become bad players overnight. But they can lose their way.

I don’t want to do an in depth analysis of every member of the squad, but by highlighting just a few I think I can make my point. The first is Oriol Romeu, in his first season with the club he was the impenetrable wall between midfield and defence, player of the season and hugely popular, his downward spiral coincides perfectly with that of the club, ending with him being a bit part player under Mark Hughes, who looked a shadow of his former self when used. Nathan Redmond has been the victim of some unsavoury over the top criticism, and somehow became the poster boy for our poor football at times. This blog was calling for Saints to sign Redmond long before they did, and never lost faith in his ability as a player, but it was often agonising to watch him take the blame from sections of the crowd for lacklustre team performances. Redmond is a dynamic attacking player, and it is almost criminal that three coaches almost managed to sap that out of him. Remember how upset we all got when Pep Guardiola weirdly berated him on the pitch for not using his attacking intent more effectively? Pep was right.

Ryan Bertrand is an odd one. Many people, myself included have bemoaned his perceived lack of interest and his unenthusiastic manner in games, but with retrospect was he just another victim of the monotonous chore being involved with Saints had become? He quickly took to his Instagram to comment on having a sense of direction under the new manager. Will we see the old Bertrand back soon?

When you look at the upturn in performances from Romeu & Redmond under the new manager, couple them with the resurgence of Jan Bednarek and James Ward-Prowse. Danny Ings scoring goals. Two Goalkeepers making serious claims for the number 1 spot. Stuart Armstrong now showing us why we signed him, and PEH looking like the player that was so highly rated by Guardiola at Bayern; you realise that we shouldn’t be in a relegation battle. Our squad isn’t poor, it was simply in a self inflicted malaise. Neil Warnock said we had the best squad outside the top 8, and while he doesn’t always make sense (#ColinonBrexit), I agree we are there or thereabouts.

So what has Ralph Hasenhüttl done differently? Well, from a very basic point of view he has immediately got the fans onside. That sounds very simplistic, and obviously if performances and results improve then that comes naturally, but, he did it before a ball was kicked. His passionate and charismatic opening gambit as Saints boss brought a renewed hope to a beleaguered faithful and that small psychological tactic, whether it was intentional or not goes a long way. The man is a leader, and instantly we wanted to follow him. If we felt like that so quickly, it is not a huge leap of faith to suggest the players felt the same.

On the pitch, it feels very much like normal service has been resumed. His intensive high pressing dynamic system is entertaining and we look like we are enjoying our football again. There is a tactical shrewdness that saw us get fantastic away results at Chelsea and Leicester and #win photos are on the rapid increase. I could bore you with the statistical comparisons between him and previous managers, but I’m sure you are already aware of them. To summarise, he has improved us in every area already, considerably, and our pathway has been re-opened. If all this wasn’t enough, his passionate reaction to goals and victorious full time whistles endears him to us even further.

It’s early days, but the future looks bright again, and the manager hasn’t even brought any players of his own choosing yet. If our form continues, we can hopefully bring this season to a close without a nail biting finish and prepare for a much more entertaining and successful one. Soon we could be back to the Halcyon days when our only worries were when our top players would be poached or where the manager might jump ship to. Oh fuck.

Keep the faith.

Chris

The Comprehensive Saints Summer Update: Part 2

It’s been a month since I brought you part one so it was about time I stopped being lazy and rounded up the rest of Saints’ Summer. It seems unreal to me that the Football League have started and we are just days away from the Premier League opener, but here we are.

Outgoings

Arrivederci Graziano Pelle. I don’t know about you but I’m sick of massive clubs coming along and taking our players, but at this stage in his career could anyone deny him a move to Shandong Lueng?

Let’s face it, never has a transfer been more about money, but it leaves Saints with a serious concern about goals. With the exit’s of both Pelle and Mane we’ve lost our two top scorers, and the majority of our assists, and that is making people nervous.

There have been no other notable outgoings in the last month, and the only real concern at the moment is the future of Jose Fonte. Let’s not talk about it and hopefully the nasty rumours will go away. I bet they don’t, and I’m prepared for the worst.

Show me the money Graz!
Show me the money Graz!

Pre-Season

Despite the ongoing annual meltdown, Claude Puel’s team have gone through the entire pre-season fixtures unbeaten.  Four wins and one draw, conceding just two goals the signs are good that the players are fitting into the style that Puel wants.

Results in pre-season rarely mean anything though, and there is still room for improvement. Saints have been blessed with a good home opener against Watford and it will be interesting to see how they start.

Saints ended pre-season with a win against Bilbao!
Saints ended pre-season with a win against Bilbao!

Kit Update

Snug.

Incomings

In Part One I suggested that the club still needed to invest in another defensive midfielder, a goalkeeper and a strike/winger.

Since then we’ve seen three arrivals in the form of ‘box to box’ midfielder Pierre-Emile Højbjerg, Goalkeeper Alex McCarthy and utility man Jeremy Pied.

The acquisition of Højbjerg is particularly exciting, and many people have suggested that he is one of the players with the highest potential in Europe and this move is somewhat of a coup.

Alex McCarthy is a keeper who has somewhat lost his way since being so highly rated at Reading. Frustrating spells at QPR and Crystal Palace means he will feel he has something to prove and should provide decent backup for Fraser Forster.

In Pied we have a player that we don’t know much about, but Claude Puel knows him and it looks like he can be used in several positions.

Much to my disappointment the paper stories linking us to Bastian Schweinsteiger did not come to pass.

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What Next?

We still need another attacking option. Be it a ‘Number 10’ or a striker, it is plain to see. There are still a couple of weeks of the transfer window left and it will be mildly disappointing if we have finished our business.

Obviously we will be waiting with baited breath over news of new contracts for Cedric, Dusan Tadic and particularly Jose Fonte. A departure for Fonte could be a devastating end to the Summer.

The key is not to worry about anything negative until it actually happens. Focus on Saturday and the start of the season.

Keep the faith.